Montana State News up and running for 2017

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This is the site o51783ee40e3b2.imagef the News and Public Relations Writing class at Montana State University. Student-generated news and feature stories will be posted here throughout the semester. Check back frequently for updates over the next four months.

Montana State News reactivated for 2016

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This is the site o51783ee40e3b2.imagef the News and Public Relations Writing class at Montana State University. Student-generated news and feature stories will be posted here throughout the semester. Check back frequently for updates over the next four months.

Montana State News reactivated for 2015

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This is the site of the51783ee40e3b2.image News and Public Relations Writing class at Montana State University. Student-generated news and feature stories will be posted here throughout the semester. Check back frequently for updates over the next four months.

Some black history not so heinous

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By HELEN SMITH/Montana State News

Most Americans have heard African American history from the southern point of view. It seems there is a different side to this story in the north.

Most history begins with the account of the first slave ship arriving in Virginia in 1619. This version does not tell of how slave traders bringing the first slaves to Massachusetts were arrested by the Puritan/Pilgrim government.  These slaves were allowed to return to Africa. According to historian David Barton, most students are taught the “bad and ugly” of history rather than positive aspects.

Very few have heard of men like Wentworth Cheswell. Considered  the first African American elected to office in New Hampshire in 1768, Cheswell was the first black landowner in New Hampshire. At age 21, Cheswell was already well established. He was even a stalwart in his church. In 1767, he married Mary Davis and the couple eventually had 13 children. More

Montana State News up and running for 2014

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Montana State News up and running for 2014

This is the site of the News and Public Relations Writing class at Montana State University. Student-generated news and feature stories will be posted here throughout the semester. Check back frequently for updates over the next four months.

Programs make independent living possible

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By MATT PARSONS/Montana State News

Ty Sherwood and Nick Fordyce seem like any other twenty-something roommates.  The only difference is that in their Bozeman bachelor pad there’s no beer in the fridge and the toilets seats are down.

Despite disabilities, Ty Sherwood and Nick Fordyce are able to live independently.

Despite disabilities, Ty Sherwood and Nick Fordyce are able to live independently.

And on the back side of their front door is a note that reads “Is it after 9 p.m? If it is…STAY INSIDE!” I wonder what this means. But I decide not to ask, not yet at least. I had just arrived.

Inside their three-bedroom, two-bath duplex, Sherwood and Fordyce lounge around in t-shirts and basketball shorts. Fordyce has a Hewlett Packard computer in his lap and Sherwood is busy cleaning up the kitchen where French toast is frying in a skillet.

Fordyce shows me what he’s been working on.

“It’s a menu for the coming week,” says Fordyce. “Ty and I take turns cooking dinner every other week.” This week was Fordyce’s. His menu looks pretty appetizing – spaghetti, pork chops, a variety of vegetables. Thursday night just says “leftovers.” Sundays are reserved for dinner with their parents.

At this point you’re probably wondering what is different about these two young men. They plan out their menus a week in advance? They clean the kitchen? They put the toilet seats down? That’s just not normal, certainly not for a 20-year-old male. Well, you would be right.

In fact, it’s quite extraordinary, especially considering that Sherwood and Fordyce have mental disabilities that prevent them from doing some of the things that many of us take for granted.  More

Treating disabled modernized in Boulder

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By LEVI WORTS/Montana State News

16C—the ward for the most severely mentally disabled at the Boulder River School and Hospital. Infants suffering from large accumulation of fluid in their brains are kept here.  Some do not even have brains, just a brain stem to keep the body functioning on the lowest level.

The facility houses a wide range of persons with intellectually disabilities and mentally illness; the residents include children to adults that vary from completely non-functioning to deaf. Families can show up and drop off persons with mental disabilities for any reason.

This was the state of mental health care in Montana when Gene Haire, the current superintendent of Montana Developmental Center, first arrived in Boulder in the early 70s.

“There were people who should not have been here but were committed because they were deaf,” said Haire. He arrived in Boulder at a time of drastic change in mental health care in Montana. In 1975 Montana legislation changed the rules for committing persons with intellectual disabilities, according to Haire. More

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